Further Cloud planning and BYOD reading

I have recently read a few interesting and useful papers relating to some of my previous posts that may also be of interest to some of the readers of this blog.  Feel free to let me know your thoughts!  Incidentally the first three papers below all originate from IBM, this is purely coincidental and I have no affiliation with IBM.

The first paper is titled ‘Defining a framework for cloud adoption’.  Please read previous posts if you need an overview of the benefits of cloud computing.  This paper introduces IBMs cloud adoption framework that is free for any organisation wishing to have a standardised reference to frame their discussions and planning around moving to the cloud.  This can be found here (free registration may be required);

http://research.itpro.co.uk/?option=com_categoryreport&task=viewabstract&pathway=no&title=20268&frmurl=http%3a%2f%2fforms.madisonlogic.com%2fForm.aspx%3fpub%3d220%26pgr%3d493%26frm%3d759%26autodn%3d1%26src%3d8644%26ctg%3d18%26ast%3d20268%26crv%3d0%26cmp%3d5941%26yld%3d0%26clk%3d5778290107730889220%26embed%3d1

The second paper worth reviewing is also around helping your company adopt cloud based services, this one is titled; ‘A logical approach to cloud adoption in your company’.  This paper seeks to aid the discussions around when and how to consider moving to the cloud and covers the fact that there isn’t actually ‘a cloud’, but multiple clouds and variations on the theme, these were covered in my previous post introducing the cloud.  This one can be found here (free registration may be required);

http://research.itpro.co.uk/?option=com_categoryreport&task=viewabstract&pathway=no&title=20770&frmurl=http%3a%2f%2fforms.madisonlogic.com%2fForm.aspx%3fpub%3d220%26pgr%3d493%26frm%3d759%26autodn%3d1%26src%3d8644%26ctg%3d1%26ast%3d20770%26crv%3d0%26cmp%3d6145%26yld%3d0%26clk%3d5778290107730954757%26embed%3d1

The third paper from IBM is titled ‘Building a successful roadmap to the cloud’.  This is a great companion to the above papers, as once you have the conversation started and people are on board with the benefits of utilising some cloud services the next step is to build the plan / roadmap for moving to and adopting these services.  This paper can be found here (free registration may be required);

http://research.itpro.co.uk/?option=com_categoryreport&task=viewabstract&pathway=no&title=20767&frmurl=http%3a%2f%2fforms.madisonlogic.com%2fForm.aspx%3fpub%3d220%26pgr%3d493%26frm%3d759%26autodn%3d1%26src%3d8644%26ctg%3d1%26ast%3d20767%26crv%3d0%26cmp%3d6145%26yld%3d0%26clk%3d5778290107731020294%26embed%3d1

All three of the above papers are definitely worth reading if your company is considering adopting cloud services, or if you want some ideas and terminology to get the conversation and planning started.

The final paper I’ll suggest you read is a balanced review of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) that covers many of the pros and cons of this current trend.  I have briefly covered BYOD and what it is before, this paper will aid you in further understanding what BYOD is, what the potential pit falls are, and if BYOD may fit into your business at all.   This one if from PC pro, not IBM just for a bit of a change and can be found here (free registration may be required);

http://www.itpro.co.uk/641935/byod-friend-or-foe?utm_campaign=itpro_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter

Happy reading, I’ll be back soon with an update on my years progress so far.

K

Simplicity

In preparation for doing the Enterprise and Solution Architecture course and exam from the Chartered Institute for IT I have started reading the book ‘Simple Architectures for Complex Enterprises’ by Roger Sessions from Microsoft press.

While this is primarily a book focused on solution and enterprise architecture, the main point it focuses on is the often overlooked one of simplicity.  The basic premise is that the most simple solution that meets the requirements is the best solution.

The vast majority of IT projects, even those that appear relatively straight forward run over time or over budget, or both.  This is despite rigorous project processes (e.g. SDLC), and well understood architectural frameworks (e.g. Zachman, TOGAF).

The reason for this is that none of the project processes or architectural frameworks directly address complexity.  They do provide much needed rigour around how projects are run, and ensure that architects and the business can talk the same language via the use of agreed frameworks, both of which add great value, but neither of which prevents unnecessary complexity from creeping into solutions.

In addition to both increased cost and time to delivery overly complex solutions are much harder to;

Maintain – which component is causing the issue when trouble shooting? Will patching one part impact others?

Secure – Simple solutions are easy to test and make secure from the outset, complex solutions are likely insecure from the outset and near impossible to fully understand and secure further down the line.

A further post will follow covering some of the techniques outlined in the book around understanding complexity and eliminating it from solutions to even complex problems.

In the mean time, keep it simple and remember just because your business or the problem you are trying to solve is complex that does not mean the solution needs to be complicated!

K