Service Technology Symposium Day 1..

So yesterday was day one of the Service Technology Symposium.  This is a two day event covering various topics relating to cloud adoption, cloud architecture, SOA (Service Orientated Architecture) and big data.  As mentioned in my last post my focus has mostly been on the cloud and architecture related talks.

I’ll use this post to provide a high level overview of the day and talks I attended, further posts will dive more deeply into some of the topics covered.

The day started well with three interesting keynotes.

The first was from Gartner covering the impact of moving to the cloud and using SOA on architecture / design.  The main points of this talk were understanding the need to move to a decoupled architecture to get the most from any move to the cloud.  This was illustrated via the Any to Any to Any architecture paradigm where this is;

Any Device – Any Service – Any Data

Gartner identified a ‘nexus of forces’ driving this need to decouple system component;

–          Mobile – 24/7, personal, context aware, real time, consumer style

–          Social – Activity streams, Personal intelligence, group sourcing, group acting

–          Information – variety, velocity, volume, complexity

–          Cloud services

In order to achieve this, the following assumptions must be true; All components independent and autonomous, they can live anywhere (on premise or in cloud), applications must be decoupled from services and data.

They also highlighted the need for a deep understanding of the SOA principles.

The second keynote speech was from the European Space Agency on their journey from legacy applications and development practices to SOA this was titled ‘Vision to reality; SOA in space’.

They highlighted 4 drivers for their journey; Federation – Interoperability – Alignment to changing business needs / requirements (agility) – Reduce time and cost.

And identified realising these drivers using SOA, and standards as outlined below;

Federation – SOA, Standards

Interoperability – SOA, Standards

Alignment to business needs – SOA, Top Down and Bottom up

Reduce costs – Reuse; SOA, Incremental development

Overall this was an interesting talk and highlighted a real world success story for SOA in a very complex environment.

The third keynote was from NASA Earth Science Data Systems.  This provided an overview of their use of SOA, the cloud and semantic web technologies to aid their handling of ‘big data’ and complex calculations.  They have ended up with a globally diverse hybrid cloud solution.

As a result of their journey to their current architecture they found various things worthy of highlighting as considerations for anyone looking to move to the cloud;

–          Understand the long term costs of cloud storage (cloud more expensive for their needs and data volumes)

–          Computational performance needed for science – understand your computational needs and how they will be met

–          Data movement to and within the cloud – Data ingest, data distribution – how will your data get to and from the cloud and move within the cloud?

–          Process migration – moving processes geographically closer to the data

–          Consider hybrid cloud infrastructures, rather than pure cloud or pure on premises

–          Security –  always a consideration, they have worked with Amazon GovCloud to meet their requirements

To aid their move to SOA and the cloud, NASA created various working groups – such as – Data Stewardship, Interoperability, semantic technologies, standards, processes etc.

This has been successful for them so far, and currently NASA Earth Sciences make wide use of SOA, Semantic technologies and the cloud (esp. for big data).

The day then moved to 7 separate track of talks which turned out for me to be somewhat of a mixed bag.

Talk 1 was titled ‘Introducing the cloud computing design patterns catalogue’.  This is a relatively new project to create re-usable deign patterns for moving applications and systems to the cloud.  The project can be found here;

www.cloudpatterns.org

Unfortunately the intended speaker did not arrive so the talk was just a high level run through the site.  The project does look interesting and I’d recommend you take a look if you are involved in creating cloud based architectures.

The second talk was supposed to be ‘A cloud on-boarding strategy’ however the speaker did not turn up, and the organisers had no idea if he was coming or not so wasted a lot of peoples time.  While it’s outside of the organisers control if someone arrives or not, they should have been aware the speaker had not registered and let us know rather than the 45 minutes of is he, isn’t he, we just have no idea that ensued..

The third talk was supposed to be ‘developing successful business plans for cloud computing projects’.  This was again cancelled due to the speaker not arriving.

Talk 2 (talks numbered by my attendance) was a Gartner talk titled ‘Building Cloudy Services’.  This was an interesting talk that I’ll cover in more depth in a following post.

Talks three to five were also all interesting and will be covered in some more depth in their own posts.  They had the below titles;

Talk 3 was titled ‘HPC in the cloud’

Talk 4 was titled ‘Your security guy knows nothing’

Talk 5 was titled ‘Moving applications to the cloud’

The final talk of the day was titled ‘Integration, are you ready?’  This was however a somewhat misleading title.  This talk was from a cloud ESB vendor and was basically just an advertisement for their product and how great it was for integration. not generally about integration.  Not what you expect from a paid for event.  I’ll not mention their name other than to say they seem to have been inspired by a piece of peer to peer software.. Disappointing.

Overall, despite some organisational hiccups and a lack of vetting of at least one vendors presentation, day one was informative and interesting.  Look out for more detailed follow up posts over the next few days.

K